Loading... Please wait...
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Glen Allan

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 

So as you know, i've acquired 4 ZV18's and Two DJ112's, and after road testing these bad boys and being around a lot of Arizona dust, they are now quite a bit dusty.

Most particularly was a desert burner party with relatively high winds which blew all kinds of dust around these things, in the logo imprints and even in the ports. While i can certainly get at these with a vacuum and canned air (i'd have to find a compressor to borrow), along with wet towels and sponges, etc..., the truck liner material is actually a bit difficult to clean.

Since i can't just take these out back and hose them down, what are the kinds of tips and techniques you guys have developed for keeping these things looking as new as possible; and should i consider at least taking the plates and grills off to be extra sure, or does the foam padding do a decent job of blocking particulates.

I think keeping this kind of high end equipment as aesthetically top notch is a big part of reputation and presentation, so let me know how to save myself some time keeping these as nice as possible.

Thanks,
Glen Allan

BASSBOSS - David Lee

Avatar / Picture

BASSBOSS Team
Registered:
Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #2 
Hey Glen,

Great to hear from you, as always. We agree, keeping the cabinets looking tight is preferable, and with some basic maintenance they can stay relatively new looking for years.

My first thought is to put them, woofers up, on a slightly smaller box or over a drainage grate. Get a microfiber towel and a bucket of clean water and wipe the box down with the damp towel. You may need to do this several times because the water will get dirty and need to be replaced.

You can remove the grill and wipe the cone with the microfiber towel as well. Once the cleaning is done, use a different microfiber towel sprayed with tire shine to bring back the shiny new look on the cabinet finish. Be aware that the tire shine will make the surface of the box more slippery, so when you're moving it, get a firm grip.

On your boxes in particular, the ZV18 subs with your custom grills, the foam grill inserts can be removed and washed with running water. Hang them to dry before putting them back in. In AZ that should take about 5 minutes. [smile] You only have to take out the perimeter screws to get the custom grill off. Don't take it apart - it was a **#*# to get together and on.

Bed-liner is a great material for durability, however as you've noted, it has a tendency to pick up dirt due to its roughness. After a bit of clean-up though, your cabinets should be looking basically new again.

Let me know if you have any more questions and thanks!
David Lee

__________________
BASSBOSS
AdubsDJService

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #3 
Ive also used a power drill and a round disk like nylon brush and a bit of dishsoap.

Do you recommend cones up to protect the amplifier?

What about (if your careful) a power washer?

Ive thought about swinging by a car wash rolling them out on the carts i made and spraying them off and then towel drying them.
Djonyx

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdubsDJService
Ive also used a power drill and a round disk like nylon brush and a bit of dishsoap.

Do you recommend cones up to protect the amplifier?

What about (if your careful) a power washer?

Ive thought about swinging by a car wash rolling them out on the carts i made and spraying them off and then towel drying them.


Power wash might be overkill! It can potentially damage something. I will just dust it off with compressed air "not the can type". Then just simply wipe it down with damp cloth.
AdubsDJService

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Power wash might be overkill! It can potentially damage something. I will just dust it off with compressed air "not the can type". Then just simply wipe it down with damp cloth.


Oh definitely. It was more of a question than a suggestion. In my case i still have remnants of "beer mud" that got ground into the top of them. Cant relly tell in the dark but I can tell heh.
BASSBOSS - David Lee

Avatar / Picture

BASSBOSS Team
Registered:
Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Glen,

Here's a bit more detail on the cleaning suggestions.

The best thing I have found is a wet magic eraser-type sponge or a wet microfiber towel. The small particles of dust will get stuck in the texture of the finish so you need something like a magic eraser to reach in and pull them out.

Pressure washing does do that pretty well but it would not be a good idea to use a pressure washer because of the potential they have to do damage to the electronics, the drivers and the finish. Even a fairly soggy sponge has a lot less chance of getting water where you don't want it. If the dirt isn't oily, as in just dust, repeating rub and rinse with the sponge will get you the best possible results. This is also the best way to remove sugary dirt.

Oily dirt may require a surfactant, aka soap, like Dawn dishwashing liquid, but use it very diluted otherwise getting the soap off will be as much of a challenge. 

Adhesives may require goo-gone or other solvents to break them down but for spilled drinks and dust, the following should do the trick.  

Put the box in a position so the dirty surface is vertical and preferably below the electronics and driver. If the dirt is on top, the best position may be on its side. Proceed to scrub with the wet magic eraser sponge. If you get a trigger spray bottle you can rinse the area with distilled water. Distilled water is recommended because it doesn't conduct electricity (until something conductive is dissolved into it,) it is the best solvent in the known universe, (more things dissolve in water than anything else we know of,) and it dries without residue but it will cost about $1.00 a gallon. 

I don't recommend scouring pads or power tools as they could remove part of your finish. What you want to do is remove the dirt and leave the finish. 

Once you get to a point where no more dirt will come out, let the surface dry completely and then apply a light coat of tire shine. The tire shine will mix with the last remaining stubborn bits of dust and make them almost invisible.

If you use a microfiber towel for drying and final dusting you'll avoid the problem of lint that comes from paper towels or cotton towels. 

Happy scrubbing! 

__________________
BASSBOSS
Glen Allan

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #7 

Just saw this...

Thanks David for all the tips. I did find that using a soft hand and nail brush does a good job for getting the majority of the dust out, and gets into the texture pretty well without damaging anything. I actually used it to clean all my gear after the desert event and they were cleaner than they'd been even before all that dust.

Luckily the dust was very fine and powdery, so nothing is lodged anywhere, and if i had the air compressor it would probably take care of 95% of it.

So far nothing it has been exposed to has been sugary or sticky, so i've not needed to use any kind of soup, and the finish is still very new looking.

I'm attaching a photo of the brush i'm talking about. Might be useful for anyone who has dusty equipment used outdoors a lot as i tend to. It gets in between knobs and buttons and in cracks quite well. [edit: That function doesn't seem to work]

I'll keep all the other tips on reference as i progress to keep these things looking new. I'll let you know as things move forward!

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:


Sign up for our newsletter

View Cart Go To Checkout